tt.abravanelhall.net
New recipes

Peck a Pickled Pepper...

Peck a Pickled Pepper...


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Pickling is a simple and basic process that, once you understand the fundamentals, will allow you to pickle almost anything. While some of the more common pickled foods are cucumbers, pearl onions, and cauliflower, this quick and simple method can be used for ginger, banana peppers, and even eggs.

To pickle something entails preserving food in a brine or vinegar mixture. If using a brine, then you will need a strongly salted water solution that can have other seasonings as well. Using vinegars with salt and other flavorful items like black peppercorns, garlic, or dill is also a common use for a pickling solution. By placing food in an acidic and salted mixture, you greatly minimize the risk of bacteria growing in the jar, which seems to be a fear on most people's minds when approaching pickling.

But fear not, because you can easily put these worries aside. In terms of sterilization and safety, if you are going to store your products for longer than two weeks and/or outside of the refrigerator, then it's necessary to follow the proper safety precautions and sterilize the jars first before storing the contents inside. It's also a safe and good idea to run the jars through the dishwasher right before you use them so that they are clean, or you can place them in boiling water for about ten minutes (just remove them carefully with tongs). Alternatively, you can try placing them in the oven at 350 degrees for about ten minutes on a baking sheet, then placing the contents inside.

These quick-pickle recipes are meant to encourage you to try pickling at home with whatever leftover ingredients you have from either your garden or just in your kitchen. They make great additions to sandwiches, dips, cocktails, or as garnishes — of course, it depends on what you're actually pickling.

Sweet, tangy, spicy, salty, sour — pickles are bite-sized powerhouses of flavor. Since this recipe calls for a quick pickling process...

— Molly Aronica

A couple of years ago, I was driving from Atlanta to San Francisco and kept walking into gas stations with big jars of pickled eggs...

— Jordan Pervere

If you're a fan of ginger, then you know about the sweet and mild flavor of the pink pickled ginger that accompanies your sushi...

— Allison Beck

With big, fat watermelons currently bursting out of gardens, this classic Southern summertime preserve is a real mouthful that mellows over time...

— Valaer Murray

Use these spicy peppers chopped up in guacamole, with scrambled eggs, on top of tacos, or in sandwiches...

— Yasmin Fahr

I first came across pickled cherries at a restaurant in New York City last year and have been curious to experiment with making them at home ever since...

— Maryse Chevriere


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.


Peck a Pickled Pepper... - Recipes

Everyone is prone to making silly mistakes now and then. Right? Well, my silliest mistake of the season was purchasing a tad entirely too many jalapeno peppers.

This is just a very small portion of the peppers I bought.
As is the case with many mistakes, multiple contributing factors converged to create the big oops. I could blame it on the fact that I read a recipe from a book in a store very quickly and totally overestimated the quantities needed later on or that I saw an outrageously good deal on jalapenos at the farmer's market, but why overanalyze things? All that really matters is that the end result was me returning home with a quarter of a bushel box of peppers. By the way, I am pretty sure that a quarter bushel actually is a peck, so the famous rhyme would be totally appropriate here. I never thought I would recreate the situation that Peter Piper found himself in so many years ago. I wonder if his spouse thought him as crazy as mine did! Anyway.

What to do with a peck of peppers? I saw lots of out-of-the-box ideas for them, but I wanted to use them in ways that would actually be beneficial to us throughout the year. We use pickled jalapenos in nachos, salsas, corn, and mexican rice dishes, so I decided to use some of the peppers to make my own.

This recipe is very simple, uses very few ingredients, and can be made quickly. Please remember to use caution with the peppers. They do burn the skin on your hands when you work with them in larger quantities, and the capsaicin remains on your skin for a long time (a peach I ate hours later tasted spicy after I held it with my hand to eat it).

Pickled Jalapeno Slices- makes 4 to 5 pint jars

This recipe comes from Canning for a New Generation. I have not changed it much except to use one of the book's secondary recommendations to use honey rather than sugar to add some sweetness. I also went with the headspace recommendations from National Center for Home Food Preservation because the book's 1 inch headspace seemed like a lot and did not correspond to any other pickled pepper recipes I saw. The recipe makes 4-5 pints depending upon how well you pack the jalapenos into the jars. They are a little tricky to get in there snugly without breaking the rings. A chopstick worked well to move them around in the jar.

2 1/2 pounds jalapenos, cut in 1/8 in rounds and rinsed to remove loose seeds
4 cups apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp honey
1 1/2 Tbsp kosher salt
4-5 garlic cloves (one for each jar)

Prepare your canner, jars, and lids.

In a nonreactive saucepan, heat the vinegar, honey, and salt until boiling. Pack the pepper slices into hot, sterilized jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Fill each jar with the hot vinegar mixture, and place a garlic clove into each jar. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace. Wipe the rims of the jars, and place a sterilized lid and ring on top of each one. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Remove jars to a towel to cool for 24 hours. Check seals, label, and store.



Comments:

  1. Faumi

    Something you are too clever. It seems to me.

  2. Shen

    Yes, sounds attractive

  3. Glaleanna

    is curious, and the analog is?

  4. Goltik

    You are wrong. Let's discuss this.

  5. Makis

    I believe you were wrong. I'm sure. I am able to prove it. Write to me in PM, discuss it.

  6. Mauramar

    Sorry, but this is not exactly what I need.

  7. Dizuru

    I absolutely agree with you. There is something about that, and it's a good idea. I support you.



Write a message